Fondue 101

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[vc_row][vc_column][vc_separator border_width=”2″][vc_custom_heading text=”When it comes to fondue, there are three main types: cheese fondue, oil or broth fondue and chocolate fondue.” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left|color:%23000000″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_custom_heading text=”Cheese Fondue” font_container=”tag:h4|text_align:left|color:%23000000″ use_theme_fonts=”yes” el_class=”uppercase”][vc_column_text]

Cheese fondue is eaten by dipping bread into a shared pot of melted cheese, using long-stemmed forks. Typically a fondue pot is shared by no more than four guests. Cheese fondue originated in the Swiss alps but is popular in many parts of the world, especially France and Italy. Traditionally, cheese fondue consists of a blend of cheeses, dry white wine and cornstarch to help thicken the mixture. The cooking pot is typically rubbed with a garlic clove prior to cooking for added flavor and Comté, Gruyère and Emmental are all popular choices for the cheese mixture since they are all low in moisture. Cheese fondue is commonly consumed as an appetizer but, because it is so rich, it can make a suitable main course.

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Chinese fondue, aka broth fondue, is a common name for hot pot, where thinly sliced meat and vegetables are cooked in a communal pot of broth (usually beef). It is considered a main course and common ingredients include mushrooms, vermicelli, sliced potatoes, tofu, and seafood. Different sauces and condiments are provided on the side and after the ingredients have cooked, the flavorful broth is often combined with noodles.

An oil fondue, also known as fondue bourguignonne, is a style in which pieces of meat are cooked in hot oil and accompanied with a variety of dipping sauces. Many types of oil can be used, including peanut, vegetable, canola, and olive. Boneless, bite-sized pieces of chicken, pork and beef, albeit lean beef, are most commonly used and, once cooked to the desired doneness, can be served with crusty white bread or a green salad.

[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”6223″ img_size=”600×400″ alignment=”center” style=”vc_box_shadow”][vc_custom_heading text=”Chocolate Fondue” font_container=”tag:h4|text_align:left|color:%23000000″ use_theme_fonts=”yes” el_class=”uppercase”][vc_column_text]

This style of fondue is a decadent dessert course, in which slices of fruit or pastries are dipped in a pot (or caquelon) of melted chocolate, and is often flavored with rum or kirsch, a type of clear, cherry brandy. Most chocolate fondue recipes use bittersweet or dark chocolate and coconut, marshmallows, pretzels and even potato chips are favorite dippers for this fondue. The most classic pairing, however, is definitely strawberries with melted dark chocolate.

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